19 Responses to “Got Facebook? A New Study Examines the World’s Biggest Social Network”

  1. 'Wale Oni says:

    You are right in your assessment of youth as an undifferentiated mass. Their use of digital media is both universal and culture-specific; this I have claimed in my forthcoming chapter of a book on CMC in Africa. It is interesting to note that “appropriating digital media (facebook inclusive) has a cultural bias in Africa, and Nigeria specifically, youths use social media specially to immortalise ideologies of dead heroes like that of Chief Obafemi Awolowo, support a political course (mostly gubernatorial and presidency) support their communal inclination (membership of schools, towns & villages), propagate private and business ideas (which may or may not be fraudulent) and ultimately, to flirt (online dating).

    ‘Wale Oni is of the Dept. of Languages & Linguistics, Osun State University, Ikire Campus, Nigeria. He’s a PhD student of the Dept. of Communication and Language Arts, University of Ibadan.

    • S. Craig Watkins says:

      Thanks Wale. The use of Facebook in Nigeria among young people is interesting and the cultural biases you note make for a fascinating look at
      the globalization and localization of social media technologies.

  2. haque says:

    Dear S. Craig Watkins,
    thank you very much to show a new notion of research regarding society and technology.Really it is opening a new era of this type of exceptional research……………

  3. Julie says:

    While this research is interesting, I wonder about the procedure, the lack of stated theory, the methods, the statistical significance (which is reported for only a very small number of variables and variable relationships), and the lack of a true discussion/strengths and limitations section. In addition, one of the things that is most interesting to me, is that this study only examines people’s output on facebook, when the thing many of us spend the most time doing on facebook is seeking information about others, and reading posts by others. It seems like quite a big oversight to only focus on our communication output and not the input that’s happening. When and if this research gets published, I’m sure the journal will require these folks to actually put some theoretical background to it, and add the standard research portions which will make the study more interpretable.

  4. Julie says:

    Ah, I take some of it back, we are looking at an executive summary. :)

  5. Thanks Wale. The use of Facebook in Nigeria among young people is interesting and the cultural biases you note make for a fascinating look at the globalization and localization of social media technologies.

  6. Andrew Walmsley says:

    very interesting. I’ve thought for some time that the willingness to share personal info online correlates negatively to social/economic/personal investment weight – in other words, as you get older, you move to a more defensive position (more to preserve). We see this in attitudes to financial investment and risk generally. The summary implies graduates are displaying this behaviour change from their earlier student patterns.

    • S. Craig Watkins says:

      You make an interesting point. The world of social media in general and the use of Facebook in particular suggests that the decision to monitor
      information can and does happen among young users. Understanding the context of use as well as key social and demographic indicators provide
      some further insight into this. As younger people are exposed at earlier ages to social media there are certainly some perils but for some youth
      this early exposure also leads to greater mentoring, support, and education that helps them develop the skills to make smarter and more responsible
      choices in the management of their digital identity.

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